LED ZEPPELIN: HOW MANY MORE TIMES (1969)

Led Zeppelin's "How Many More Times" is included in my in-progress Spotify Playlist Stormbringers & Mammoth Riff Riders—a heavy package of big lumbering brontosaurus riffs to kick out coronavirus. Other than Led Zep there's also old school veterans from the likes of Deep Purple, Thin Lizzy, Black Sabbath, et al.
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print


“How Many More Times” is the ninth and final track on Plant/Page/Jones/Bonham’s 1969 debut album, Led Zeppelin.

At eight and a half minutes, “How Many More Times” is the longest song on the album. It’s one of three Led Zeppelin songs on which Page used bowed guitar.

In an interview he gave to Guitar World in 1993, Page stated that the song “was made up of little pieces I developed when I was with the Yardbirds, as were other numbers such as ‘Dazed and Confused’. It was played live in the studio with cues and nods.”

The title and Plant’s vocals reference Howlin’ Wolf’s “How Many More Years” (1951), as well as other songs by blues musicians he admired at the time of recording.

John Mendelsohn of Rolling Stone called “How Many More Times” the album’s “most representative cut”. Mendelsohn especially complimented Page’s guitar solo and Bonham’s drumming.

This song is also included in my newest Spotify playlist: Stormbringers & Mammoth Riff Riders—a heavy package of big lumbering brontosaurus riffs to kick out coronavirus. Other than Led Zeppelin there’s also old school veterans from the likes of Deep Purple, Thin Lizzy, Black Sabbath, Judas Priest, Grand Funk Railroad, Kiss, AC/DC, et al.


Speaking of the video, Plant-Page-Jones-Bonham, such a powerhouse of the godforsaken rockers, dontcha think?

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print
Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.
Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.

Leave a Reply

  Subscribe  
Notify of
Scroll to Top