CHIEF JOSEPH SURRENDERS

Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce peoples surrenders to U.S. General Nelson A. Miles in the Bear Paw mountains of Montana, declaring “Hear me, my chiefs: My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.”

WEST SIDE STORY OPENS ON BROADWAY

63 years ago today, the most acclaimed musical of all time, West Side Story, opens at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway.

SIOUX’S CRAZY HORSE IS KILLED

143 years ago today, one of the most notable and iconic of Native American warriors, Oglala Sioux leader Crazy Horse is fatally bayoneted by a U.S. soldier after resisting confinement in a guardhouse at Fort Robinson, Nebraska.

THE LAST NATIVE AMERICAN WARRIOR, GERONIMO, SURRENDERS

On this date in 1886, the last Native American warrior, Apache leader Geronimo, surrenders to U.S. government troops. For 30 years, the Native American warrior had battled to protect his tribe’s homeland; however, by 1886 the Apaches were exhausted and hopelessly outnumbered.

I HAVE A DREAM

On this date in 1963 Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered “I Have a Dream”, one of the best known speeches in U.S. history, second only to Lincoln’s 1863 “Gettysburg Address”.

DISCO INFERNO: THE NIGHT DANCE MUSIC DIED

41 years ago today, disco was killed by a public backlash with the infamous Disco Demolition Night at Chicago’s Comiskey Park. At least 9 were injured and 39 got arrested.

I DON’T LIKE MONDAYS

In 1979, Brenda Ann Spencer (16) opened fire on Grover Cleveland Elementary School shooting eight children and three adults which ended up killing the school’s principal, Burton Wragg, and the caretaker, Mike Suchar. Spencer’s shooting became particularly notorious for inspiring Bob Geldof to write “I Don’t Like Mondays”.

JOHN HINCKLEY JR. FOUND NOT GUILTY

38 years ago today John Hinckley Jr., was found not guilty of attempted murder—he tried to kill President Reagan—by reason of insanity.

FLOWER POWER

The expression Flower Power was coined by the American Beat poet Allen Ginsberg in 1965 as a means to transform war protests into peaceful affirmative spectacles. Ginsberg advocated that protesters should be provided with “masses of flowers” to hand out to policemen, press, politicians, and spectators. The use of props like flowers, toys, flags, candy, and music were meant to turn anti-war rallies into a form of street theatre thereby reducing the fear, anger, and threat that is inherent within protests.

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