NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS: THE WEEPING SONG

This is a weeping song. But I won't be weeping long.
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“I think a lot of people are reading too much into this—organized religion or war or whatever.

I think it’s a lot more basic than that, though. If you want to live your life, have relationships, love other people. Well, it’s inevitable that you will just end up weeping for your trouble at some point.

Everything ends sooner or later—relationships go sour, children grow up, friends lose touch, loved ones die, and then so do you.

‘I won’t be weeping long’.

So I guess it’s okay to weep, to mourn, but you have to stop eventually and live your life too, or you’ll miss all the good bits in between the sad bits?

I dunno. I don’t think this song is ‘depressing’ just a… pleasant melancholy.”

I pretty much agree with the explanation above—courtesy of telegramsam17—about “The Weeping Song” by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds feat. Blixa Bargeld (The Bad Seeds, Einstürzende Neubauten) co-lead “Father” vocals.

I think the message in “The Weeping Song” is actually quite positive. That’s life, it goes on. I like this cocky statement by Winston Churchill in handling bitterness of life: If you’re going through hell, keep going.

Yes, true, this is a weeping song. But I won’t be weeping long.


“The Weeping Song” included in Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds third album, The Good Son, which was a substantial departure with a lighter and generally more uplifting sound after two dark and harrowing first and second albums. The change of mood was greatly inspired by singer Nick Cave falling in love with Brazilian journalist Viviane Carneiro. “I guess The Good Son is some kind of reflection of the way I felt early in Brazil. I was quite happy there. I was in love ….”

The video here via Morgan Wolfe, Nick Cave duets with Blixa Bargeld performing live “The Weeping Song” for a British TV program, June 1990.

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Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.
Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.

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