PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE LET ME GET WHAT I WANT

Enjoy a gorgeously mopey and beautifully miserable Sunday morning song, “Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want”—originally sung by The Smiths.
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Here’s a gorgeously mopey and beautifully miserable Sunday morning song, “Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want”—originally sung by The Smiths.

It was released as the B-side of “William, It Was Really Nothing” in 1984, it has been covered by numerous other artists. The Dream Academy, Muse, Deftones, Hootie & The Blowfish, She & Him, and many more. I love the version here by Elefant, a now-defunct indie rock quartet from New York.

This song ranked number one on Sean Ross’ Top Ten Most Depressing Alternative Rock Songs list: “If someone has been able to express self-pity and whininess better than this song, I haven’t heard it. How many kids have sobbed along with this song in their bedroom?”

Such longing and heartache. Short, bitter, and poignant. This is one of the Smiths songs that deals straightforward with the meaning and the music. It’s wishful thinking in poetry.

“For once in my life, let me get what I want. Lord knows, it would be the first time.”

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Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.
Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.

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