¡Feliz Aniversario Sandinista!

Tepat setahun—di bulan yang sama, Desember—setelah London Calling, The Clash merilis Sandinista! di tahun 1980, tanggal 12. Album ke-4 ini kian kuat menggambarkan minat besar Joe Strummer dan Rekan pada “world music”—bagi saya merekalah pionir “ethno punk”. Eksplorasi yang telah dilakukan di London Calling makin dilebarkan di Sandinista! Unsur funk, calypso, disco, serta rap ikut disertakan.

Homegrown & Well Known: ANOM DARSANA

When a stranger gives you a difficult 2-in-1 task: “I need a local guy who understands about international-standard sound recording and is also able to organize sophisticated music concerts,” no need to be panic, just say this name: Anom Darsana.

Domestic Groove: THE SECRET AGENTS

Favourite albums at the moment: Superbad Soundtrack vol. 38: The Return of Setan Tete (compiled by Gooodit) and Superbad Soundtrack vol. 34: Super Suranta I (compiled by David Tarigan)

Rock-n-Roll Exhibition: REBEKAH E. MOORE

Edition: November 30, 2011

Rock-n-Roll Exhibition: REBEKAH E. MOORE
Rock For Our Rights: The Planets Rarest and Most Radical Protest Songs

:: Playlist, intro, song descriptions, and photos, handpicked and written by Bekah herself ::

This stage has no podium. These musicians are not politicians, news reporters, or educators. They are Indonesian citizens who share, with those in the pit tonight, a concern for justice. This rock concert is a demonstration: a loud, emotion-filled rally for honesty and equality. The dissenters do not move forward, marching in unison. They move in danceamoshing, head banging, grasping compatriots, and singing, in unison, songs that unite them and give poetic shape to a deep longing for something better, for one and all…

I found these words in my research journal in 2010, written shortly after accompanying Bali-based grunge/psychedelic rock band Navicula on a tour to Jakarta to launch their latest single, “Metropolutan” (Metro-pollutant). One week earlier, the song was released for free download on the Internet.

“Metropolutan” marked the band’s latest critique of environmental degradation in Indonesia, a response to the pollution crisis in the nation’s capital. Each night of the tour, hundreds of Navicula fans crammed into Jakarta venues and sang this song collaboratively, having memorized the lyrics after just a few days of repeated listening.

As an ethnomusicologist, I came to Indonesia to study the development of the independent music industry in Bali following the 2002 bombings. But that tour, and my many other encounters with music activism in Indonesia and throughout my career have led me to a preoccupation with music as it debates and defines social justice.

For my installation in this Rock-n-Roll Exhibition, I present just a handful of the many protest songs I’ve encountered over the years and across nations. I exclude such distinguished artists as Rage Against The Machine or Bob Marley, as well as a number of definitive protest anthems, from Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Goin’ On” to Phil Ochs’ “I Ain’t Marching Anymore,” despite my immense respect for these artists and anthems. Rather than revisiting the familiar classics (though I still sneak in a few favorites), I opt to explore a selection of artists—diverse in their styles, origins, and social concerns—who may be lesser known, and whose lyrical themes or personal activism has tantalized and scandalized their respective nations.

In the mushrooming heat of global activism in which we find ourselves today—the fire that started on Tahrir Square and spread to Wall Street now burns in the hearts of rebels throughout this very nation—these real radicals of rock demonstrate that change begins with a brave and loud few. These musicians, I contend, uphold the highest standards of human rights and our greatest hope that, in Sam Cooke’s prophetic words, “a change is gonna come.”

♬ Radio streaming live: http://army.wavestreamer.com:6356/listen.pls

Domestic Groove: AYU LAKSMI

DOMESTIC GROOVE ~ Celeb’s Chosen Seven is my biweekly column in The Beat (Jakarta) mag. Basically it’s an interview via e-mail which focuses on small, intimate, domestic stuff; what Indonesia’s public figures are really into, musically speaking.

For the 11th edition I went upclose-and-personal with Ayu Laksmi.

Tonite! A Journey!

Tonite! Wednesday, November 24, 2010; 8-10 PM

R-n-R Exhibition [mini version]: MIAN TIARA
A Journey

:: Introduction, playlist and photo, written and handpicked by Tiara herself ::

Let’s pack our stuff, we’re going on a trip, visiting places, travel through time and space.
But first, bring what you need. Put them in your backpacks. Make sure all is checked. We might have to give up what we have and trade them with things along the road. Because that’s a road trip is all about. No expectations, only excitements. Everything is random. We will not have the knowledge to see what is going to happen. We just have to experience it. Here’s a little something to add something to your life.

Now, let’s get lost.

♪♬ ♫ Radio streaming live http://army.wavestreamer.com:6356/listen.pls

Domestic Groove: BONDAN PRAKOSO

DOMESTIC GROOVE ~ Celeb’s Chosen Seven is my biweekly column in The Beat (Jakarta) mag. Basically it’s an interview via e-mail which focuses on small, intimate, domestic stuff; what Indonesia’s public figures are really into, musically speaking.

For the fourth edition I went upclose-and-personal with Bondan Prakoso.

Wham! Bang! You’re Dead, Man!: Soundtracks of Last-Kiss Goodbye

Edition: September 08, 2010

Wham! Bang! You’re Dead, Man!

Today is the 1st anniversary of BlokRokinBeats. Each and every person who participated/doing exhibition before, was asked to pick one song with special theme: a track that they would use for their funeral, soundtrack of their last-kiss goodbye, song to overdose to, farewell-and-wish-you-well (or hell), a solid calibre of “danse macabre”.

BlokRokinBeats ~ Wham! Bang! You’re Dead, Man!

Tonite! Wednesday, September 08, 2010; 8-10 PM

Wham! Bang! You’re Dead, Man!

Today is the 1st anniversary of BlokRokinBeats. Each and every person who participated/doing exhibition before, was asked to pick one song with special theme: a track that they would use for their funeral, soundtrack of their last-kiss goodbye, song to overdose to, farewell-and-wish-you-well (or hell), a solid calibre of “danse macabre”.

Rock-n-Roll Exhibition: STEVE GAMBOA

Edition: May 26, 2010

Rock-n-Roll Exhibition: STEVE GAMBOA
Inspirations/Mutations

:: Playlist, notes, and a few photos, handpicked & written by Steve Himself ::

This selection of tracks is a synoptic reflection of the music and bands that greatly influenced me as a youth playing in punk bands in Washington, DC from 1988 — 2000.

Growing up in ‘The Chocolate City,’ a southern town with an incredible musical legacy the likes of Duke Ellington, Marvin Gaye, Go-Go and D.C. Hardcore, I was very fortunate to have been exposed to a diverse range of music from my peers in the D.C. scene where I was brought up with the understanding that being a punk rocker meant not only that you listened to punk rock, but were also open to listening to all underground music regardless of genre, an ideology that I still maintain today as an active DJ. While it’s impossible to list most of the songs that influenced me during this period that was the most formative phase of my life, this playlist gives you a brief but personal idea of the groups and individuals that impacted my musical direction, manifested my politics, determined my style and made it on the tour van mix tapes.

Hope you can dig on it…

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