THE CURE – CUT HERE

The Cure’s Robert Smith wrote “Cut Here” in memory of his close friend Billy Mackenzie (The Associates) who committed suicide in 1997. Likewise, I’d like to dedicate this gorgeously sad song to two of my besties who passed away last month: Ayip and Gusde Sutama. Rest in power, brothers.

DEPECHE MODE – JUDAS

“Judas”, from Depeche Mode’s Songs of Faith and Devotion (1993), caught my attention a bit late. It took me a while to embrace it. But then once it got stuck on you, it kinda got stuck forever.

A WHITER SHADE OF PALE

According to a chart compiled for BBC 2 in 2009 today, “A Whiter Shade of Pale” was the most played song in public places in the past 75 years.

COACHELLA: 20 YEARS IN THE DESERT

No Coachella this year. But here’s the documentary. So good. Very well produced. It makes you realise that this festival is way historical.

LED ZEPPELIN: HOW MANY MORE TIMES (1969)

Led Zeppelin’s “How Many More Times” is included in my in-progress Spotify Playlist Stormbringers & Mammoth Riff Riders—a heavy package of big lumbering brontosaurus riffs to kick out coronavirus. Other than Led Zep there’s also old school veterans from the likes of Deep Purple, Thin Lizzy, Black Sabbath, et al.

DIALOG DINI HARI: KULMINASI II

Pasca dirilisnya album penuh terbaru mereka pada Juli 2019, Parahidup, trio asal Bali Dialog Dini Hari ini kembali dengan single “Kulminasi II”. Secara khusus, single ini, mendokumentasikan perjalanan umat manusia menghadapi pandemi yang secara global mengubah cara hidup kita semua. Kendati menghadapi kehidupan yang mencekam, ketiganya masih bergerak untuk mencipta.

LIAM MCKAHEY: SO LONG, MARIANNE

Ladies and gentleman, here’s Liam McKahey. An under-appreciated charismatic male singer from UK. One of my most fave male singers.

SEND ME A POSTCARD

Soundtrack to the end of world. Apocalypse is coming, darling.

UDERZO DIED AT 92

The French comic book artist, Uderzo, passed away a few days ago due to heart attack. He’s well known in Indonesia via Asterix & Obelix.

SPANISH FLU VS SALT WATER

During World War 1, reporting of the Spanish Flu was largely supressed in order to maintain morale amongst the troops. Spain was not involved in the war and had not imposed wartime censorship. As a result, the media was free to report on it and coverage of the virus only increased when King Alfonso XIII came down with a nasty case. The Allies only read in depth accounts from Spanish sources and so they naturally assumed the country was ground zero for the pandemic.

Scroll to Top