INTERPOL, NYC, & CARLOS D

Some people thought—prematurely concluded—the New York sharpest-dressed miserablists, Interpol, would collapse after the charismatic bassist Carlos Dengler left the band. But after watching them in Singapore last year, trio formation, without Carlos, I am definitely convinced: no one is irreplaceable.
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

One thing that made me even more convinced from watching Interpol last year—exactly in November—in Singapore: no one is irreplaceable.

Some people thought—prematurely concluded—the New York sharpest-dressed miserablists would collapse after the charismatic bassist Carlos Dengler left the band.

As you can see in this early days video after they released their magnificent debut, Turn On the Bright Lights. How Carlos D stands out in a crowd. His looks, his style, his gesture, he’s got a very strong persona. Like GNR’s Duff McKagan, Metallica’s Cliff Burton, Fleetwood Mac’s John McVie. No wonder people would think if he left Interpol, it would screw up the band. Or at least causing a catastrophe to the career of the grayest post-punk fashionistas.

But then, Paul Banks & co. released El Pintor.

Dom Gourlay from Drowned in Sound scored it 9 out of 10 and stated, “their finest record in a decade”.

While NME gave 8/10 and said, “It would be hard to argue that Interpol are as vital as they once were – even with such an accomplished new work under their belts – but, fifth time round, they’re proving there’s still plenty of value in their elegantly downtrodden aesthetic.”

And the first song in the album, “All the Rage Back Home”, has become one of Interpol’s concert anthems.

Interpol’s performance at Neon Lights last year, it’s a solid sign that they are even bigger, better, badasser.

Photo: Matador Records.

No one is irreplaceable. See you and sorry, Carlos D.

__________________

Featured image: IMDB.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print
Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.
Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.

Leave a Reply

  Subscribe  
Notify of
Scroll to Top