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THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE WOMAN

Yemeni photographer Boushra Almutawakel makes us reflect on the living conditions of women in contexts where religious fanaticism prevails.
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“Mother, Daughter, Doll”, from her series “The Hijab Series”, 2010 | Boushra Almutawakel

Boushra Almutawakel, the first-ever recognized female photographer of Yemen, makes us reflect on the living conditions of women in contexts where religious fanaticism prevails. Her work highlights the strength and courage of Middle Eastern women.

Boushra Almutawakel, the first-ever recognized female photographer of Yemen, remains distinct for being the first, but also for daring to voice the cultural and religious controversies prevailing in her country through her talent.

When Boushra sees that her work conjures up strong feelings and provokes engagement, discussion, and debate, she feels she has succeeded.

Born in Sana’a, Yemen, in 1969, Boushra Y. Almutawakel studied in the USA and Yemen. It was during her time as a student, that she became interested in photography.

On her return to Yemen in 1994 she continued developing her photographic work, doing freelance photography, and participating in many group exhibitions. In 1998, Boushra became a full-time photographer, and some of her clients have included the United Nations, CARE International, the Royal Netherlands Embassy. Her work has been acquired by the British Museum in London, The Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, the Barjeel Foundation, as well as by other well-known collectors.

The photographer has been working for many years. However, recent developments in the world, especially in Afghanistan, make each of her projects surprisingly timely.

Her photographs question the place of gender in a more subtle, often playful, way by challenging people’s expectations. The artist often talks about women’s rights and comments on their reality controlled by men.

In “What If” she challenges the norms of society by picturing men in a veil instead of women. This idea was immensely popular with females but attracted great criticism from men.

Finding the veiling of Muslim women to be a controversial issue, and also considering the diverse opinions it attracted, Boushra wanted to project the various facets of Hijab through her art.

Women and girls in many countries as well in Yemen are treated as if they don’t exist, except to serve their husbands, in-laws, and children – treated as if they are nothing. The famous photo series “Mother, Daughter, Doll” gradually veils a woman, a girl, and her doll until they literally disappear.

In her hijab series, she takes the viewer on a visual journey through the different nuances of what it means to be veiled.

The images on the veil are symbolic of women and girls having no rights. Those are stories of girls and women being deprived of play, education, and childhood by being married off at such young age, raped.

Women and girls should have the same opportunities as men and boys. Girls and women should be equally appreciated for being of the female gender – and be empowered, instead of being put down, because of it.

• Read also MBB: WORKING FOR COLORFUL INDONESIA.

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First paragraph via Thinking Humanity.
The following paragraphs via albawaba.
Featured image via The Guardian—Masih Alinejad, an Iranian activist who has spent her life fighting for women’s right in her country through a campaign against the law that says the women have to wear hijab, over their hair when they’re in public, has paid a high price. She’s been sentenced to prison, fled her native Iran and is unable to see her family.

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Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.
Rudolf Dethu

Rudolf Dethu

Music journalist, writer, radio DJ, socio-political activist, creative industry leader, and a qualified librarian, Rudolf Dethu is heavily under the influence of the punk rock philosophy. Often tagged as this country’s version of Malcolm McLaren—or as Rolling Stone Indonesia put it ‘the grand master of music propaganda’—a name based on his successes when managing Bali’s two favourite bands, Superman Is Dead and Navicula, both who have become two of the nation’s biggest rock bands.

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RUDOLF DETHU

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